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Part 3

Sharing Consumer Stories for Maximum Impact

The world’s top companies are using agile video feedback to build great brands, products, and experiences.

Video feedback can be extremely powerful, and the experts at Voxpopme have compiled some best practices to help you get the most from your consumer videos for maximum impact in your business.

In this 3-part series, we’re sharing some tips and tricks for asking the right questions, what to look for in your video analysis, and how to craft a powerful story with the findings to engage your business and direct key strategies.

By the end of this series, you’ll leave with actionable nuggets that you can integrate into your research program and become even more of a research rockstar than you already are!

Let’s get this party started

According to a Forbes study, 59% of senior executives say that if both text and video are available on the same topic on the same page, they prefer to watch video. Why? Videos let them see the real human response to the concepts, ads, products, places and experiences you share with them. Video feedback is designed to help them see and understand these genuine interactions through the emotion people express themselves with - what customers think, feel, and do in their natural environment.

Video brings the voice of the customer into the boardroom, but it is still essential you craft and present a compelling story to your audience. As Dr. Uri Hassan (Ph.D., The Weizmann Institute of Science) Has said:

“A story is the only way to activate parts in the brain so that a listener turns the story into their own idea and experience”

We know that data is powerful, but with a good story, it’s unforgettable.

You’ve likely already written your outline (see Part 2 - Analyzing Video Feedback to Uncover Hidden Treasure), but it’s important to now build a powerful story and package your video insights in the best way possible to keep the audience engaged.

So what can we learn from traditional storytelling to produce more engaging research deliverables?

Structure, structure, structure! The key to a good story is its’ flow One way to do it is to divide your story into three parts:

  • In Part 1, you introduce the characters and the obstacles they face
  • Part 2 is devoted to how the characters deal with the problem
  • And Part 3 describes the resolution

Fairy tales are great examples of classically structured stories:

  • They begin “Once upon a time” and introduce you to the person who the story is going to be about. (A poor but sweet girl)
  • Then they introduce the conflict. (A wicked stepmother and a bunch of rotten stepsisters. A prince looking for true love. A fancy ball. A glass slipper)
  • Finally, fairy tales describe how the problem was overcome. (In the whole kingdom, the glass slipper only fit her foot) and move to the resolution. (They lived happily ever after)
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More on Storytelling

It’s also important to give your audience the facts. Every journalist answers five essential questions every time he or she writes a story: who, what, where, when and why.

Here’s an example to demonstrate how to tell a story while including all essential information. We’ve flagged the who, what, where, when and why:

Screenshot 2020-09-16 at 15.20.44

Selecting the best video clips

Now that we know the story we want to tell, let’s use video to bring the story to life. The video clips are effectively the words and pictures of our story so we need to think about which ones will best illustrate our story.

You’ve probably already identified the clips that were integral to your analysis (we discussed the two schools of thought here in Part II of the Visionary’s Handbook, section titled Earmarking the best videos to include in your showreel), and now we need to decide which are the best to include in your final deliverable. To do this, consider the criteria below.

Demographic representation

  • Which clips represent a breadth of genders, ages, ethnicities?

Supportive of Analysis

  • Does the response support my analysis findings?
  • Does it contribute to my story?

Engaging

  • Is the respondent animated and/or excited?
  • Visual and audio quality, can I clearly see and hear?

Succinct

  • Does the response succinctly convey the respondent’s intended message?
  • Think short, sweet, and to the point! Ideally, all clips are 15-20 seconds each.

If you have multiple clips that qualify and say roughly the same thing, think carefully about which you include in your showreel. Unless there is a reason to show that several people have the same view (i.e. the result is particularly negative and the audience may need convincing that many people feel the same), choose the best one as one powerful video is usually better than many repeating the same sentiment.

Selecting the best video clips

Now that we know the story we want to tell, let’s use video to bring the story to life. The video clips are effectively the words and pictures of our story so we need to think about which ones will best illustrate our story.

You’ve probably already identified the clips that were integral to your analysis (we discussed the two schools of thought here in Part II of the Visionary’s Handbook, section titled Earmarking the best videos to include in your showreel), and now we need to decide which are the best to include in your final deliverable. To do this, consider the criteria below.

Demographic representation

  • Which clips represent a breadth of genders, ages, ethnicities?

Engaging

  • Is the respondent animated and/or excited?
  • Visual and audio quality, can I clearly see and hear?

Supportive of Analysis

  • Does the response support my analysis findings?
  • Does it contribute to my story?

Succinct

  • Does the response succinctly convey the respondent’s intended message?
  • Think short, sweet, and to the point! Ideally, all clips are 15-20 seconds each.

If you have multiple clips that qualify and say roughly the same thing, think carefully about which you include in your showreel. Unless there is a reason to show that several people have the same view (i.e. the result is particularly negative and the audience may need convincing that many people feel the same), choose the best one as one powerful video is usually better than many repeating the same sentiment.

Arranging your clips to tell a powerful story

Remember, you want the showreel to succinctly summarize the key takeaways, so it is important to select only the best snippets of a response for inclusion. Voxpopme’s Best Practices recommend using snippets no longer than 15-20 seconds each.

As you arrange your clips in your list, you should consider the flow, or order of clips, in your final deliverable. Starting and ending on strong clips is ideal (i.e. attention-grabbing, brings it all together, puts a smile on your face, plays a specific role).

It’s also important to remember the structure of storytelling... our introduction, our climax, and our resolution.

Using text slides to add context

Screenshot 2020-09-16 at 14.46.37

The Nice-to-Haves - Add images to text slides!

 

Stimulus from concept testing

  • If you tested stimuli, a key part of the journey is for your audience to understand what this stimuli was

Word Cloud

  • Word Clouds visualize the key themes for the audience - and it is particularly useful for questions like “In 3 words, describe x”

Quant data visualization

  • If you are presenting statistics, show the audience! They will be much more engaged with charts/graphs vs. text
Part 3 Sharing Consumer Stories - Voxpopme

Showreel design

Now that the videos and text slides have been added to your list, it’s time to polish. Below we have outlined Voxpopme’s recommended best practices.

Screenshot 2020-09-16 at 14.57.48

Whats Next?

We hope these best practices were useful for you when considering your approach to writing qualitative research questions for video feedback.

Have more questions? Our team is always on hand to collaborate with you and identify the biggest opportunities to incorporate rich, agile qualitative insight into your research program.

Best Practices for Video Research

Part 1 

Writing Amazing Video Questions for Brand and Product Feedback

Part 2  

Analyzing Video Feedback to Uncover Hidden Treasure

Part 3  

Sharing Consumer Stories for Maximum Impact